Spleen Surgery in Surat

Spleen

The spleen is found underneath the skeletal structure within the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. The spleen is the largest organ of the lymphatic system. It’s a crucial organ for keeping bodily fluids balanced, however one can live normally even after its removal. The spleen plays multiple supporting roles within the body. It acts as a filter for blood as a part of the system. Red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells are recycled within the spleen. The spleen together helps to fight against kinds of bacteria that cause respiratory disorder and communicable disease. Read and know in brief about the disease and basics of Spleen Surgery in Surat.

Indication for spleen removal:

Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly): Associate enlarged spleen, usually caused by fever because of microorganism, cancers (lymphoma and leukaemia).

Ruptured spleen: The spleen is in danger of injury, ruptured spleen can cause serious internal bleeding and may be an emergency.

Sickle cell disease: This can be the sort of aneamia, in which abnormal red blood cells block the flow of blood through vessels and might cause organ injury.

Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count): Associate enlarged spleen typically stores excessive numbers of the body’s platelets. Oversized hypertrophy may lead to excessive cell death of platelets and leads to thrombocytopenia

Spleen cancer: Spleen cancer symptoms may be abdominal discomfort, pain or lumpish feeling in the left upper abdomen sometimes also with shoulder pain.

Spleen removal

Enlarged Spleen (Splenomegaly): Associate enlarged spleen, usually caused by fever because of microorganism, cancers (lymphoma and leukemia).

Ruptured spleen: The spleen is in danger of injury, ruptured spleen can cause serious internal bleeding and may be an emergency.

Sickle cell disease: This can be the sort of anemia, in which abnormal red blood cells block the flow of blood through vessels and might cause organ injury.

Thrombocytopenia (low platelet count): Associate enlarged spleen typically stores excessive numbers of the body’s platelets. Oversized hypertrophy may lead to excessive cell death of platelets and leads to thrombocytopenia

Spleen cancer: Spleen cancer symptoms may be abdominal discomfort, pain or lumpish feeling in the left upper abdomen sometimes also with shoulder pain.

How is laparoscopic removal of the spleen done?

You will be placed under general anaesthesia and be completely asleep. A cannula (hollow tube) is placed into the abdomen by your surgeon and your abdomen will be inflated with carbon dioxide gas to create a space to operate. A laparoscope (a tiny telescope connected to a video camera) is put through one of the cannulas which projects a video picture of the internal organs and spleen on a television monitor. Several cannulas are placed in different locations on your abdomen to allow your surgeon to place instruments inside your belly to work and remove your spleen. A search for accessory (additional) spleens and then removal of these extra spleens will be done since 15% of people have small, extra spleens. After the spleen is cut from all that it is connected to, it is placed inside a special bag. The bag with the spleen inside is pulled up into one of the small, but largest incisions on your abdomen. The spleen is broken up into small pieces (morcellated) within the special bag and completely removed.

In a small number of patients, the laparoscopic method cannot be performed. Factors that may increase the possibility of choosing or converting to the “open” procedure may include obesity, a history of prior abdominal surgery causing dense scar tissue, inability to visualize organs or bleeding problems during the operation.

The decision to perform the open procedure is a judgment decision made by your surgeon either before or during the actual operation. When the surgeon feels that it is safest to convert the laparoscopic procedure to an open one, this is not a complication, but rather sound surgical judgment. The decision to convert to an open procedure is strictly based on patient safety. Dr Dhaval Mangukiya with vast experience for laparoscopic Spleen Surgery in Surat available at SIDS Hospital for his expert advice and solutions.

What are the advantages of laparoscopic splenectomy?

  1. Less postoperative pain.
  2. Shorter hospital stay.
  3. Faster return to a regular, solid food diet.
  4. Quicker return to normal activities.
  5. Better cosmetic results.
  6. Fewer incisional hernias.

Risks

There is as such no major risk after splenectomy surgery, but small risk is associated with it which include bleeding, blood clots, infection and all this is manageable.

What care should be taken after a splenectomy?

We recommend getting vaccines, including a pneumococcal vaccine, Haemophilus B vaccine, Meningococcal vaccine before in case of plan splenectomy surgery and after in case of emergency splenectomy.

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